Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Recovering from Cold Temperatures and Frost

Abnormally cold temperatures and frost created significant injury in most corn and some soybeans.  Many soybeans were planted late enough that they had yet to emerge by the time of the cold temperatures and frost on 5/14/16 and 5/15/16.  By and large soybeans were spared from the frost, that said, several thousand acres of early planted soybeans will be replanted in Southeastern Minnesota.

Corn injury and recovery appears to be influenced by planting date.  Reports from the earliest planted corn (4-10-16 to 4-12-16) are that injury was not too significant and that they have recovered well.  I have not validated these claims with any of my own observations.

The second corn planting date, around April 19th, sustained serious damage and has had the most difficult recovery.  My infield observations are that stands have not been reduced by much, if at all, by the frost. That said, the crop has come back unevenly and upwards of 20,000 of plants per acre remain buggy-whipped or tied up as of Monday May 23rd (stand counts remain at 34,000 to 35,000).  Plants from this planting date exhibit a wide range of symptoms that vary by field and within fields.

Damaged

Damaged Recovering Normally

Damaged Recovering Buggy-whipped

Damaged Recovering Buggy-whipped

Damaged Recovering Buggy-whipped

Damaged Recovered Leaning

Dead

Corn planted in the 3rd planting date around the 26th of April appeared to have sustained the most significant damage initially, but they are recovering better than the second planting date.  Generally this corn looks better and has fewer buggy-whipped plants.  Generally there are 3,000-8,000 plants per acre that are buggy-whipped.  Attempts to "unfurl or untie" plants by clipping have very mixed results and have the potential to cause negative results.  A good overview on this topic can be found here: http://cropwatch.unl.edu/2016/risk-freeze-damage-early-planted-corn

Finally, corn planted the first part of may was not affected by the frost.  It is one or two stages behind early planted corn, but looks nice and healthy.

  

 We will update as the season continues.  We would appreciate learning about what you are experiencing, so don't hesitate to contact us or post a comment below.

Ryan Miller
mill0869@umn.edu

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